Tips for Throwing the Best Christmas Party of the Season

The holiday season is all about parties, festivities, and events. But if you decide to host a Christmas party, you’ll want to make it worth everyone’s time.

Instead of planning something safe and average, go for the home run. Make it an exceptional Christmas party that people remember for years to come!

Four Tips for a Memorable Christmas Party

Choosing to host a Christmas party is a big decision that demands a significant commitment and even sacrifice. Whether it’s a party for friends, family, coworkers, or neighbors, you’ll want to go above and beyond so the event is enjoyable and memorable for everyone.

Here are a few tips and pointers:

 

  • Choose a Theme

 

Every memorable Christmas party has a theme, so this is where you should start. Everything else will be based on this vital choice. Here are a few ideas:

  • Costume. Who says costumes have to stop with Halloween? Everyone loves a good costume party, and Christmas offers an opportunity to finish the year with a bang. As the host, take your costume to the next level with a fancy Christmas suit.
  • Formal. Perhaps you have a desire to feel all grown up and host a formal Christmas party with cocktail attire. If you choose to go this route, make it clear that guests should dress in evening gowns and black tie.
  • Color. Want to give your guests some flexibility, yet still have a cute theme? Ask people to wear only red, green, and white. Better yet, ask all the men to wear green and women to wear red (or vice versa).

These are just a few ideas. You may certainly get even more creative and come up with your own unique theme.

 

  • Send Invitations Early

 

Holiday calendars can fill up fast. If you want your party to be well attended, send out your invitations early and pick a date when there are less likely to be conflicts. (By all means, avoid the weekend before Christmas.)

On your invitation, make the details crystal clear. If people are expected to wear something specific, bring a dish, or show up with a white-elephant gift, this needs to be clearly stated.

These days, an email invitation is acceptable. However, you should note that emails are often overlooked and treated less seriously than traditional invitations that are on paper and arrive in the mail.

So if you have the capacity in your budget, send your invitations through the mail.

 

  • Plan Ahead on Food and Drink

 

The biggest expense of a holiday party is usually the food and drink. Make sure you plan ahead so the cost doesn’t get out of hand. To lower expenses, you can also do the following:

  • If there will be alcohol, it’s perfectly acceptable to ask people to bring their favorite bottle of wine or six-pack of beer. If you decide to provide everything, try to spread the purchase out over a few weeks (rather than buying everything the night before).
  • Consider providing the main dish for the meal, but asking guests to bring a side dish, appetizer, or dessert.
  • Purchase food in bulk from a warehouse store like Costco or Sam’s Club. If you’re going to be feeding a large number of people, you can save a considerable amount by doing this.

If you don’t have the budget to provide a large meal for many guests, compromise by making your party an afternoon drop-in. With this kind of holiday event, people understand that there may only be light snacks and hors d‘oeuvres for munching.

 

  • Be an Engaging Host

 

As the host, you have a responsibility to mingle with your guests and speak to everyone in attendance. Keep conversations to just a few minutes so you have time to work the space and see as many people as possible.

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

If you’re apt to host a forgettable Christmas party, you might as well not undergo the hassle. When there’s so many different holiday events on the average person’s calendar, why should you waste their time?

By planning an exceptional party, you can give folks something to look forward to and remember. As you plan your party, try not to let the little details throw you into a tizzy.

Instead, focus on getting the big picture right. This will empower you to relax and enjoy the event.