Building Orientation in Hot and Dry Areas is of The Highest Importance

Hi favorite friends. If you are in plan to build a new house, read this blog and see the images. We are going to show you some very interesting facts. The first and the most important step while you are building a new house – the location. Is that location right for placing our house? This is the question that we need to ask in our heads. That step will decide about the house situation.

Important thing about the house building is where your windows and door will be installed. I mean on which side. You may have warm house inside even if the weather outside is cold. And all this, if you have chosen the proper place for your new house building. What is important also: the distance between the other buildings near to your house, the efficient sun energy, natural ventilation. Places that are far away from the sea are hot and dry. Remember this. Pay attention to all of these things.

Orientation of building should be done for the climatic zone in which the building of the new house is situated. The purpose of orientation is to provide residents a comfortable living space and warm house. People need this through the whole year, and only through the summer period. See through our chosen images how is this possible.

See how building orientation in hot and dry area is of the highest importance. Don’t miss something that we give you for free. Free ideas for you and your friends, because you are our favorite readers. Thanks for following us, have a nice rest of the day. Keep following us.

 

Photo via www.architectureadmirers.com

 

Photo via www.theconstructor.org

 

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Photo via www.architectureadmirers.com

 

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Photo via www.sustainabilityworkshop.autodesk.com

 

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Photo via www.see.murdoch.edu.au